October 11, 2011


 Greetings from the Sierra Tarahumara,

 Midwifery

“If you feed a man a fish, you’ve fed him a meal—if you teach him how to fish, you’ve fed him for a lifetime”. I am sure many of you have heard this statement previously. It summarizes the goal of the CHE program we talked about in last month’s update, and is the basis of my calling to train indigenous midwives. In order to teach, I must first be able to speak the national language, and even better, learn the indigenous language…a daunting task. Since the departure last year of my fellow midwife and friend, Shelley, the birth center she previously operated has been closed (and is now the building in which Mark and I live). The Tarahumara women have been birthing once again in the Hospital Mision Tarahumara, operated by Mexico Medical Missions. Until now, Dr. Mike and Maci, directors of MMM, wisely and appropriately discouraged me from involving myself in the hospital births. As a midwife, I do things very differently than the doctors and nurses there are accustomed to, and without the ability to communicate well I could easily cause offense and irreparable damage. Before we moved to Mexico I had been given the very sound advice to “build personal relationship before professional relationship” with the staff of the hospital. For the last six months I have been doing that very thing—a conversation here, lending a helping hand there. I have learned the names of staff, gained insight into their personal lives, developed fledgling friendships and have provided, and enjoyed, many good laughs while attempting conversation in my floundering Spanish.

 A couple weeks ago Michelle returned, Shelley’s previous midwifery student. Michelle spent over a year here, speaks Spanish, and worked in the hospital a great deal of time learning from the doctors and nurses anything they would teach her, in addition to the midwifery skills she was learning from Shelley. She gained the friendship and trust of the staff there, and they now want her to do the vast majority of the maternity care—key word being “want”. I am the more experienced midwife, and Michelle has the language and well-established relationships. Together, we make a great team. Tagging along on her heels, so to speak, I now have a welcome ‘entrance’ to the maternity care in the hospital, the opportunity to serve there, gain familiarity with their processes, learn about the Tarahumara women with respect to their birthing traditions, and set the stage for the future when we will train Tara midwives in the presence of the hospital staff. The goal is a team effort, where we work together respectfully, unified in and by Christ’s love. “I am in them and you are in me. May they experience such perfect unity that the world will know that you sent me and that you love them as much as you love me.” John 17:23

 

In the past week I had the wonderful privilege of assisting Michelle with two births and witnessing the beginnings of this concept taking place. The staff are curious to see “how midwives deliver babies”, and were very supportive. We had two first-time young mothers, who both delivered beautifully and without complications! The first had a very long, slow labor but without trouble, and afterwards there was a full knot in the cord, something that could have been fatal to the baby had it pulled tight. The second mother’s labor progressed well and normally, and she gave birth to a nice sized baby boy with his hand alongside his face, and without tearing the mother. The doctor present had never seen anything like this! He seemed quite happy afterwards. It was all very rewarding for me, as I’ve struggled with health issues this summer (keep reading) and have been away from birthing for many long months. I discovered that my love and passion for birth is as alive as ever.

 

Bean Crop Failure

 

Please keep the Tarahumara in prayer as the crops have failed throughout the Canyon. Even four hours north of the canyon, in the large Mennonite settlement where excellent crops are usually produced, the beans have also failed. Supplies state-wide are low and the price is beginning to skyrocket! Last winter was the coldest in over 100 years, freezing many of the ancient cacti which are a food staple of the Tara. It was also lacking the usual winter moisture, bringing about a severe drought. The desperately needed rain came late this summer and ended early—the season lasted only a month, and held less than the average rainfall throughout its duration. This is spelling calamity for the Tarahumara, and could lend itself to all sorts of undesirable activities in the future year.

 

 

Pray for Jean’s Health and Provision

 

In moving to another country at this “later” time in life, I was prepared for the challenges of culture shock, language difficulties, isolation and loneliness, and the plethora of other necessary adjustments, but I wasn’t expecting any serious health concerns any time in the near future. After arriving here, I began to experience frequent “sciatica” in my left hip and leg (nerve pain), and it has worsened rapidly over the summer to the point where I cannot sit for any length of time without great pain. I have also experienced body chemistry changes, which has caused severe sleep deprivation. I have not been able to function at 100%, and this has delayed my language acquisition process as well. Two weeks ago I obtained an MRI, and the results show a fairly serious problem in my low back. I’ve consulted with my previous c-spine surgeon in Denver, who would only perform surgery on this region as a last resort. After much research, consulting, and prayer, I have decided to proceed with prolotherapy treatments, which are designed to bring about a healing process of the ligaments and cartilage, thus providing a long-term result and preventing future surgery. This will require several short trips out of Mexico over a period of months, and I’ve chosen to do this in Arizona as the doctor there is a specialist with this treatment, and Arizona is a closer driving distance to our location in Mexico.

 

Amazingly, this procedure is considered ‘conventional medicine’ by our health plan, and will be covered! We have also been blessed with a place to stay, in the home of friends from Samachique, while in Arizona for treatments. The Lord has provided for much of this need already! However, it is a drive that involves two days each way, with an overnight in Mexico while traveling. We will still incur some motel, fuel and food expenses while doing this extra traveling. Our support is at approximately 50% of our estimated budget, and God has been taking care of us well, in spite of this. We live very frugally and conservatively, and have not lacked for necessities. Please pray with us that God will provide all we need to cover this. Please pray also for complete healing in my back, chemistry to come into balance, and sleep to return.

 

Thank you, Love and Blessings!

 

 

Contact:

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Donations:

Mexico Medical Missions

4001 County Rd. 114

Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

http://dhority.lifegivers.org/contactsupport/

 

 

 


 

September 3, 2011

 

Greetings from the Sierra Tarahumara,

 

We want to begin this update with a special thank you to Nancy Wiswell for all of her time and work to get us set up in the King Soopers scripts program. Nancy has taken care of all the administrative details to make this a reality, and we say a heartfelt “THANK YOU Nancy”! We also want to thank Nina, Jeff and Barb for their respective roles and support of this project. This a great way to help us without taking any additional money out of your budget. To participate or get more information, please contact Nancy at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. ‘Thank You’ to all of you that have already begun participating in this program—you are such a blessing!

 

A recent Sunday started off like any other, waking to a peaceful morning and fresh air after Saturday’s rain. Carlos came calling early that morning; he takes care of many of the day to day needs of the hospital. Today his request was a little different, as he needed my (Mark) help to transport a body from the hospital back to the family’s home. This involved building a crude box, placing the body in the box, and driving to a remote village. The Tarahumara would have a viewing day that Sunday and then the body would be buried the following day. Manuel was a 19 year old that had his legs crushed by a large log in one of many logging accidents here in the Sierra’s. The only option for the doctors was to remove both of his legs from just below the hips. This took place months ago and Manuel had good days and bad days throughout his long recovery process. Unfortunately, Manuel had other health issues that ultimately took his life that Saturday night. The good news is that Manuel had heard the “Good News” and had given his life to Jesus as a result of the witness of hospital staff, praise God! He had a sweet spirit and his face radiated peace and joy rather than the pain and suffering he endured. We continue to lift up his family in prayer and trust that they will be positively impacted by the transformation that took place in their son while he was in the hospital.

 

Death is very different here in the sense that it is truly a way of life for the Tarahumara. Yes, there is grieving, and yes, there are tears, but it happens so often here to young people that it is much more accepted than in the States. If you remember, only 50% of children make it to the age of five.

 

In addition to our current duties and learning Spanish Jean and I have started our CHE (community health evangelism) training. Good humanitarian aid work has been done here for many years and many Tarahumara have benefited from it. However, there has been little of a visible impact in reaching lost souls. I know a lot of seeds have been planted, but the numbers of those who have come to the saving knowledge of Jesus Christ are few. CHE will provide for both, the health ministry and the spiritual ministry, allowing our work here to touch the whole person. There is a lot of training and it will take many months to complete, but it is necessary to fill the gap that currently exists. We are very excited about this and feel privileged to be part of a cross cultural team consisting of Tarahumara, Mexicans, and Americans. CHE is a proven ministry model that is currently used in 106 countries and having a great impact.

 

We believe that making a lasting impact in this area will take a move of God. We know that our work is not about us, but about Him. Please pray with us that He will use this team to forward and increase his Kingdom. The Word says that everyone will have the same opportunity as we all have had, to become sons and daughters of God and joint heirs with Jesus, and then the end will come! Thank you so much for joining with us as we all push forward through this present darkness into His unsurpassed light.

 

May His love and blessing fill every area of your life.

 

 

_____________________________________

 

August 1, 2011

 

Greetings,

 

As another month has rolled past we find ourselves finally settling into some regular routine here in the Sierras. Overall it has been a calm period, lacking any hair-raising adventure. This is a good thing! Even though there are bad things that happen in the area, God is faithful and continues to protect us and our fellow workers.

 

The rains have begun, Thanks to God, albeit a month later than usual. Isn’t it awesome how He has his own timing, and His ways are so much greater than our ways! Although it now rains daily, the land is a beautiful green and the starving animals have relief, even though the Tara’s crops are severely behind schedule. This could prove devastating as the year progresses, as hunger and malnutrition could be the result. Please continue to pray for abundance of rain to fall on the Sierra, and slightly warmer temperatures, to aid the crops in growth acceleration! This is another opportunity for us to look to our Heavenly Father, as 2Ch 7:14 states, If my people, which are called by my name, shall humble themselves, and pray, and seek my face, and turn from their wicked ways; then will I hear from heaven, and will forgive their sin, and will heal their land. This land of darkness needs healing in so many ways. Lord, may Your light shine forth brightly.

 

Meanwhile, we are both plugging away daily with language learning, which absorbs a great deal of our time and energy. This is our top priority for this first year. Until we acquire sufficient competency in Spanish we cannot be effective in much of anything else, as all aspects of life require effective communication. This includes Jean’s future goals of training indigenous midwives; she must keep first things first. Things are moving along in the right direction however, slowly but surely. Michelle (Shelley’s previous midwifery student here, now fully trained) is returning in September, and the CHE team is gradually coming together (Community Health Evangelism, in which Jean will be a part). For now, we’re enjoying the season to settle in here, learn the culture, become adept at Spanish, and build new relationships, all of which will prove critical in the future. Mark continues to work alongside the maintenance guys here completing various projects throughout the week. His skills are a welcome asset to them, and he finds the work rewarding.

 

We attend church and bible studies a few times a week with members of the MMM community. This includes meetings that take place in the hospital waiting room on Sunday and Wednesday evenings. These are attended by people representing three cultures: Mexican and Tarahumara hospital staff, a few Americans like us, and Tara hospital patients who are often drawn out of curiosity. These meetings are all in Spanish, so we don’t understand everything that is said, but they provide an excellent opportunity for all of us to become informed and pray for the needs of the individuals and families present and of those being treated in the hospital. It is also a great opportunity for us to be completely immersed in the language and culture. These times are often followed by pot-lucks or desserts to celebrate birthdays and the like. We have learned that Mexican culture places a high value relationships and celebrations, and the most is made of every opportunity.

 

As a short follow-up to last month’s update: We received the news that the well pump installed was just in time, as the little seepages the people dip water from in the driest months of May and June had dried up completely. We all Thank God for this timely blessing!

 

We thank you for your continued prayer and support; you are such a blessing to us

 

___________________________

 

May 5, 2011

 

Greetings from Samachique to our friends, family and partners! We also want to welcome all of you from The Rock who signed up on our list a couple weeks ago. We are honored to have you on our list and keeping us in prayer!

 

We arrived in samachique a week ago on Monday, and we can say Praise God for safety, protection, and provision as we made our way to the Copper Canyon over Easter weekend. It was a challenging journey, but God is always faithful to meet the needs when we allow Him to lead.

 

The trip we had planned to take in two days ended up taking three. Three of the four trailer tires blew-out and needed to be replaced. We've attached some photos of the journey (that Mark took along the way while driving), and entitled one particular photo "Bad Hair Day"--you'll know which one! Mark pulled the trailer, as seen in the photo, for 30 miles into Cuauhtemoc. His trucking background came in pretty handy, and the trailer drove essentially on one axle over mountains with some steep hills. Fortunately we weren't into the canyon yet! The canyon drive occured on the third day, and all the replacement tires held up well. We made the final stretch, with its steepest grades, without any trouble! The tires all looked good at the onset of the trip, but apparently weren't up for the rigorous miles required. Mark changed more tires on the side of the road than he cares to think about, but the good news is that they didn't blow out at the times and places that could've been dangerous, and the delays provided us with good opportunities to become quickly acquainted with certain towns along the way, good little taquerias in which to *dine*, and a nice little hotel in Cuauhtemoc, which let us use their locked garage to store our trailer overnight and while we searched for acceptable replacement tires on Monday morning.

 

We were blessed on our trip Saturday night by a sweet and open-handed family in El Paso who provided us with dinner, a good night's sleep, and breakfast early Sunday morning. Thank you Howells! The border crossing on Sunday morning was uneventful, and we went through without any difficulty. Shelby, our sweet lab, handled it all with exceptionally calm demeanor and continues to make the adjustment and new doggie friends here very well.

 

We have spent the first of the week getting our stuff unpacked, sorted, repacked, restored and settled--as we are temporarily staying in someone else's mostly-furnished home about a quarter mile down the road at another ministry facility. An American surgeon is currently occupying our intended home while building his own on the property. Once it's complete he will move, and free up the place he is in now for us. Mark has begun today to help with the construction finish, and the doctor's carpenter from the US also arrived this week to finish it out. We would appreciate prayer for this project to move along smoothly.

 

We hiked up to "The Rock", as it's referred to here, that overlooks the ministry property. The Garmin says it's 7000 ft. elevation where we live, and was 7486 at the 'Rock'. The photo of the property was taken as we started up the hike. As you look at these photos, notice how steep the hillsides are, and note the lack of shoulders on the roadsides--one of many good reasons not to break down while driving in the canyon. What you can't see in the photos are the steep grades of the roads combined with successive hairpin curves, much more than allowed by Federal Law in the US.

 

A few days ago we invited ourselves along for the ride to the town of Guachochi (an hour to hour and a half drive, depending on who's driving) with Dr. Bruce, the surgeon living in "our home", for a grocery shopping trip. He gave us the scenic tour of the town which included the local hardware store, hospital location, and other places important to know. This town is the closest for a "full sized" market, by local standards, which of course is not comparable with stores in the US. We hope to get out a bit more in the next few weeks and become more familiar with the region.

 

As we assimilate to the new culture, we are again reminded that life runs at a much slower pace than what we're accustomed to in America. We have to take those deep breaths and sloooow down often. We must be patient when we can't get online when we want to, and allow much more time for casual conversations that regularly 'interupt' our intended task. We are walking miles everyday even though we have vehicles here--it's just not necessary, or apporpriate, to use them regularly. We walk miles everyday--to town for produce from the market, and several trips back and forth to the MMM property. By doing this, we are moving slowly enough to observe the local life occuring around us; we nod, wave, and whisper "quira", (Tarahumara 'hello') to all we pass--the women wearing their babies in robozos on their backs, the men in their jeans or loincloths, depending on their level of traditionalism. We 'take in' the loose cattle and abundant dogs roaming the streets, the burro with her new baby only a few days old, the skinny goats and horses searching the parched land for a morsel of green. This is the end of 9 months of 'dry season', where dust covers the land, our homes, our hair, our clothes. In another month or so the rain will begin, and within days the area will become vivid green. We have never been here during the rainy season and are looking forward to seeing the beauty firsthand.

 

We've found everyone very welcoming and friendly this week, and many have expressed their thanks to us for coming. We've shared many meals with other missionaries working in the region, and have been blessed to meet many whose lives exemplify the awesomeness of our God! We feel priviledged to be a part of this great company, who regularly experience miracles in their daily lives and can testify to the power of God. We are excited to begin our new life here fulfilling whatever exactly is in God's plan for both of us. We know your prayers have held us steady through what is really a very difficult time of transition, and we are grateful! Thank you!

 

We also want to say thank you to all of you who have sent replies to us this week, and let you know that our internet access is not consistently reliable at this time, so we haven't been able to write everyone back individually. We really do appreciate hearing from you, even short little notes!

 

We are excited to be here and can clearly see the Lord directing our steps. More than ever, we thank you for your love, friendship, prayer, and support! We could not be here without you!

 

For His Kingdom,

Mark and Jean

 

--

Mark and Jean Dhority

~Bringing Life, Health and Hope to the Tarahumara

 

Contact:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Donations:

Mexico Medical Missions

4001 County Rd. 114

Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

 

http://dhority.lifegivers.org/contactsupport/

 

 

_________________________

 

March 15, 2011

 

Hello Everyone,

 

Praise God, he is good and faithful! I arrived back in CO early Sunday morning safe and sound following a wonderful week in the Copper Canyon. The weather was beautiful with temps in the high 60's, and our things in the trailer appear to have made the journey without damage.

 

I had the opportunity to build some new relationships with other missionary families in the region this week, and that was a tremendous blessing. We enjoyed many good conversations, laughs and fellowship. I can see the hand of God on so many details simultaneously in daily life these days, and am acutely aware that our steps are truly being "ordered by the Lord".

 

Mark and I will make our full move to Mexico in mid April. We are coordinating dates with other missionaries needing to caravan with us. It is wise and helpful to travel in small groups, so delaying our departure a few days to make this happen is well worth it.

 

We are so grateful for all of your prayers for us!!! We know the Lord is going before us because of your prayer. As we enter the next few weeks of final preparations we ask that you would continue to lift us up regularly--for our health, for details to come together smoothly, the travel and border crossing to be uneventful and for favor with border officials, for our family members who are lovingly supporting us in spite of their mixed emotions, and for those whom God would raise up to join us as partners in prayer and finances.

 

God Bless all of you richly!

For the Kingdom,

Mark and Jean

--

Mark and Jean Dhority

~Bringing Life, Health and Hope to the Tarahumara

 

Contact:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Donations:

Mexico Medical Missions

4001 County Rd. 114

Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

 

http://dhority.lifegivers.org/contactsupport/

 

 

______________________

 

March 8, 2011

 

Hi Everyone,

 

This email is a bit long as I've not had regular or reliable access to internet since my arrival three days ago. I will write now while I can, and most likely not again like this until I'm home.

 

As most of you already know, it is not wise to be on the roads here after dark. Although we had a wonderful trip down sunday, and a perfectly smooth border crossing with the trailer full of our stuff, we did end up running a bit behind on schedule and had to *rush* through the last stretch of the journey—an hour and a half of solid 15-20mph hairpin curves on grades so steep they are prohibited by federal law in the U.S. We arrived later than preferred as the darkness closed in, but without mishap safe and sound. But to give you all an idea of the vastness of these canyons I’ll share a little story. One of the vehicles in our caravan contained a group of men coming down from a Denver church for a week long construction mission. After a few minutes of driving into the canyon, one of them got on the walkie-talkie and said, “Has anyone counted how many times we’ve gone up and down already?” Cheryl, wife of Phil who was pulling the trailer, responded, “We’re just getting started. We have three mountain ranges to cross in the next hour.”

 

I found out when I arrived in the area where I would be lodging for the night, and am very grateful for a comfortable bed and a cozy home with another missionary family here. As they have been here for years, I asked them to describe to me the network of canyons, and help me get my bearings on exactly how large and deep they are, and where we are located in relation to the whole system. He said the 25,000 square mile figure we’ve found online is most accurate, and that all the driving we did coming here just brought us in to a point near the end of one of the canyons, Urique, and we’re still essentially on the rim. 30 miles farther in would put you to the center of this canyon, and then it drops in elevation to its lowest depth about 4000 feet. We are also sitting at a point between this canyon and another, Batopilas, which is probably the largest of the five in the system. Batopilas has a depth of 6000 ft. However, what takes hours to drive can be done in minutes by air, provided you have a place to land the plane. As I was on the 4WD road from the villages this afternoon a thought occurred to me. “This is *God’s country* alright….because nothing else besides God should be out here”.

 

Early this morning I checked in with Ivan, the 40-ish Physician’s Assistant (PA) from New Mexico whose family joined the mission here just over a year ago. Ivan goes out to remote villages a couple days a week to treat the sick, and I wanted to be sure to ride out with him one of the days this week. He goes to villages I’ve never had the chance to see, but will be involved with in the future. Finding out that he was leaving in an hour, I made a short-notice decision and took off with Ivan, two of his five children and the two young school teachers for a slow and bumpy 90 minute four wheel drive to the first of two villages he planned to visit today. We arrived at the first village, which is the pilot village for the CHE (Community Health Evangelism) program being implemented by MMM as their model for health evangelism work. We spent the rest of the morning there, where he treated about a dozen adults and children for relatively minor illnesses—an uneventful morning. Then we headed to the second village, which at first appeared to be even more uneventful. But one woman who came began to describe the condition of her “101” year old grandmother. Tarahumaras rarely know their exact ages, but once we saw this woman we knew the reported age may very well be close to accurate—extremely rare among this people. At minimum she's in her 80's. Ivan asked if the family could bring her to us, and they said they would bring her in a wheelbarrow. I was shocked. “A wheelbarrow?” “Yes”, he said, “They do it all the time”. While we waited for this enigma to arrive Ivan finished with other patients, and we noticed that it was getting past the time we needed to be heading back to Samachique in order to make it home by dark. Ivan went to ask someone directions to the old woman’s home, and I was taking photos of some curious children while waiting at the front of the little clinic. I heard more voices, and I looked up to behold a sight I will probably never forget. An ancient looking traditional Tara man was pushing a wheelbarrow towards me with what looked like nothing more than a blanket for its contents. A large contingent of family members of all ages followed him—it was quite a crowd. I approached them quickly and looking down into the wheelbarrow realized there was a very small and frail woman curled up inside.

 

After a quick evaluation, Ivan let the family know this woman needed to go immediately to the hospital in Samachique, and we would take her with us, along with one family member. After several minutes of rearranging the vehicle to make room for them, we got her into the SUV and headed out. We had an hour and a half to dark, and the trip was at least that long. About halfway down we had to move over to the far right side of the road to allow a large logging truck to pass. This is a single lane, 4WD road, very sandy, with steep, sandy drops on the side into a ditch. Our rear wheel slid down the sandy embankment and lodged us neatly with back end in the ditch. But Praise God, within seconds another logging truck came by who quickly pulled us out with his chain. But as we drove down the road we heard a very loud hissing sound and discovered that the left rear tire was had a leak, and it wasn’t a slow one. The tire was flattening in a hurry. Ivan tried to inflate it using his combo jump box with compressor, to no avail. We did have a spare to use, but as it was getting dark rapidly, and we would not have been able to take our elderly passenger out of the vehicle to jack it up, Ivan opted to run on the tire and get us as far as possible. We had nearly 30 minutes of travel ahead. All I could do was pray, which I did discreetly all the way down. I literally felt like I was praying us down the mountain. Praise God, the tire held without blowing off the rim, and although it was ruined, it got us down to town. It really was miraculous!

 

We got the woman safely to the hospital and they confirmed her to be in dire condition with pneumonia and possibly congestive heart failure. Unfortunately, I found out today that she died this morning. Such is life here in the Sieras.

 

Meanwhile, I’ve been challenged with difficulty getting on the internet, and enough electricity to charge my computer adequately. I met Dr. Bruce, the doctor currently residing in the building we will be living in. His home is still far from completed, but now moving along at a quicker pace with some hired workers on the job. If it is not completed by the time we come in April we will most likely be staying temporarily in a very tiny trailer set up on the property. Of course, as the saying here goes, “all plans are set in jello”.

 

Thank you so much for your continued prayers this week. I am acutely aware of the need for the prayers of our friends back home as life here can present serious challenges on a daily basis.

Love to all!

 

Jean

 

--

Mark and Jean Dhority

~Bringing Life, Health and Hope to the Tarahumara

Contact:

 

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Donations:

Mexico Medical Missions

4001 County Rd. 114

Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

http://dhority.lifegivers.org/contactsupport/

 

 

_______________________

 

Feb 27, 2011

 

Hello Everyone,

 

Grace and peace to all of you in the Lord Jesus Christ! I can so identify with Paul's greeting to the churches as we so appreciate all of you and your faithfulness to us in prayer, friendship and support this year!

 

I'm writing this morning to provide a quick update. As you know, we are planning to head down to Mexico in the first week of April. Our first trailer load of belongings will be taken down next week by friends who have offered to help us move, and Jean will be traveling with them, returning in a week. Originally they were going to accompany us in April, but have had to change their plans to accomodate other committments. This weekend we will be sorting our things to prepare for this first load. We have a lot of things to juggle and decisions to make around all of this so please keep us in your prayers for wisdom, peace and to follow the Lord's leading.

We completed linguistic training last Friday in beautiful Palmer Lake, CO at the Mission Training Institute. The program is called PILAT, which is an acronym for Program in Language Acquisition Techniques. It was absolutely awesome!

 

Following the program, we moved again on Monday back to Elizabeth, CO to stay in the home of the friends who have been storing our furniture and boxes for the past several months. It seems that the Lord has caused us to go *full circle* in the front range the past few months, and given us the opportunity to make several new friends in the north who have been a great blessing to us.

As you can see, we've moved around quite a bit in the past two months, and are now *buckling down* in preparation for the big move. We so appreciate those of you who have graciously opened your homes to us through this period, including several short overnights on weekends in the north, and we feel so blessed to see the Lord leading, guiding and providing each step of the way.

 

We ask that you would continue to pray for us as we handle many, many details in the next few weeks. "A man's heart plans his way, but the Lord directs his steps". Pr. 16:9

God's richest blessings be upon you!

For the Kingdom,

Mark and Jean

 

--

Mark and Jean Dhority

~Bringing Life, Health and Hope to the Tarahumara

 

Contact

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Donations:

 

Mexico Medical Missions

4001 County Rd. 114

Glenwood Springs, CO 81601

 

http://dhority.lifegivers.org/contactsupport/

 

 


 

April 2010

Hello Friends and Partners!

We hope you all received the email update Mark and I sent out after returning from our exciting and productive trip to Mexico in January. We so appreciate the prayer and financial support many of you provided that made it possible. We couldn’t have done it without you!

To share a recap: God is calling us to full time ministry. We will join the work of Mexico Medical Missions and Rivera Ministries who minister to an unreached people group, the Tarahumara Indians of the Copper Canyon, through medical and midwifery care.

The Tarahumaras are one of the only two known people groups in the entire world without a system of traditional midwifery. All tribal peoples have always had midwives - women who posess the knowledge to guide mothers safely through the birthing process. Somewhere along the way, the Tara’s lost their midwives. The Tara women birth alone and unassisted, suffering and often dying from complications that are easily prevented in the hands of a trained attendant.

God has called us not only to provide midwifery care to the people of this region, but to train indigenous Tarahumara women to become midwives themselves, thereby reintroducing midwifery back into their culture.

We believe that through this apprenticeship process, we will also be effective in bringing many of the Taras to the saving knowledge of Christ, as we have intimate access to their hearts and their lives.

It is God’s heart and our heart to reach the Tarahumaras - that they will be a part of the great company that will be gathered around His throne worshiping the Glory of His Name. In Revelation 5:9, John sees this and exclaims, “. . .by your blood you have ransomed people for God from every trib and language, people and nation.

Our hope is to move to Mexico by November of this year, and our cost of living will be approximately $3000 a month. We cannot go without your help! Whether you can give a small or large amount - monthly, yearly, or a one-time gift, it will be a tremendous blessing.

To give everyone a chance to learn more about what we’ll be doing, we’ve made an audio-visual presentation of the ministry. We would like to show it to as many people as possible, and would appreciate your help to accomplish this. Please call or email us if you’d like to help by sharing this presentation with friends or church groups.

Thank you for your love, support, your prayer and your friendship!

All for the Kingdom!
Mark and Jean

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